Macy’s Dickens Village – A Christmas Carol You Can Walk Through


Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol - 2011 Update -Schedule and Hours

This is a free event. Also, there are no "shows", so to speak, unlike the Comcast Holiday Spectacular, or the Macy's Holiday Light Show. You can enter and leave at any time you wish.

Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol - will begin on Black Friday, November 25, 2011, and be open to visitors up to and including New Year's Eve, 2011/2012. It will be open from 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM, every day, except for Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. (Note that the Macy's Dickens Village closes an hour earlier than the Macy's Holiday Light Show, which closes at 8:00 PM.)


The Macy's Dickens Village is a beloved, cherished Philadelphia Christmas tradition. Since 1985 - when it opened at the now-gone, and much-lamented Strawbridge & Clothier department store - it has been part of Christmas time for Philadelphians of all ages. Since the 2006 Christmas season, it has been dwelling at Macy's Center City Philadelphia location, located at 13th and Market Streets. (Macy's, in turn, is the new occupant of the old, beloved John Wanamaker Department Store, which opened there in 1911.

What Is the Macy's Dickens Village?

The best way of describing the Macy's Dickens Village, is that it is like traveling back in time, for over a century and a half, to Victorian London. The British author Charles Dickens first published A Christmas Carol in 1843, and it remains the most popular Christmas book in the world.

It is - literally - a life-size rendition of A Christmas Carol. When you walk inside, you are transported back to 1840s London, with narrow alleys and plenty of tiny shops.

We recommend that you meander through the Macy's Dickens Village - and we recommend that you meander, rather than rush, for this reason:

You'll miss a lot of the artistic touches, if you race through.

If you take your time and savor every moment, you'll get a feel for what it must have been like at Christmastime in London, circa the 1840s. You will walk past a highly elaborate series of vignettes, each depicting a scene from A Christmas Carol.

Each vignette will have a wooden sign, with beautiful calligraphy, explaining the scene. The titles will be in red, and the text white. You will see human characters, whom in some cases, will move. It really brings the novel to life.

Overhead, there will be arches, with Gothic type face, reading, respectively:

Christmas Past
Christmas Present
Christmas Yet to Come

At the end of the terrifying Christmas Yet to Come scene, you pass through another archway into the happy ending of Christmas Morning, and you enjoy the familiar ending of A Christmas Carol.

Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol - Schedule and Hours

This is a free event. Also, there are no "shows", so to speak, unlike the Comcast Holiday Spectacular, or the Macy's Holiday Light Show. You can enter and leave at any time you wish.

Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol - will begin on Black Friday, November 26, 2010, and be open to visitors through New Year's 2011. It will be open from 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM, every day, except for Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. (Note that the Macy's Dickens Village closes an hour earlier than the Macy's Holiday Light Show, which closes at 8:00 PM.)

Can I Easily Combine A Visit to the Macy's Holiday Light Show and to Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol?

Yes. The Macy's Holiday Light Show is located in the Grand Court; the Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol is located on the third floor of Macy's.



The Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol - The Visitor Experience

If you'd like a highly detailed, in-depth guide to Macy's A Christmas Carol, along with some fascinating context, about the actual 1843 novel and its publication, Christmas in Victorian Britain, and other interesting facts about Dickens and the story, we'd recommend that you take a look at our still-being-completed page:

Macy's A Christmas Carol Guide.

Be patient with it, please, as we haven't gotten to all of the scenes yet, but what we do have, we believe you'll find very interesting...

Scenes

You arrive, and you see a gigantic open book on the wall. You see an illustration of Scrooge holding Tiny Tim in his arms, in the midst of a large wreath, on the left side; on the right side:

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens – This Edition Published By Macy’s

(Of course, prior to 2006, it said, This Edition Published By Strawbridge’s).

Macy's Dickens Village - A Christmas Carol - The Scenes

You Enter Victorian London, Circa the 1840s…

The Gentlemen of Goodwill
Bob Cratchit
Nephew Fred
Tiny Tim
A Vision of Marley
Marley’s Apparition in Scrooge’s Bedchamber

Part 1 - Christmas Past


The Ghost of Christmas Past
Scrooge As a Boy
Fezziwig’s Party
Belle
Sister Fan
Belle Returns the Ring

Part 2 – Christmas Present


The Ghost of Christmas Present
The Cratchit Home
Nephew Fred’s Christmas Party

Part 3 - Christmas Yet To Come


The Ghost of Christmas Future

Thieves’ Den on Beggars’ Alley (no wooden sign, just a guide)
Old Joe and the Thieves
Scrooge Sees The Cratchits Mourning Tiny Tim in the Graveyard
The Graveyard Scene

The Ghost of Christmas Future Unveils Scrooge’s Own Gravestone
Scrooge Goes To Sleep In Terror
The End of It – Christmas Day
Christmas Morning
Tiny Tim and Scrooge in Front of the Christmas Tree

Notes: All of the tombstones in the Graveyard are jokes, references to Dickens’s life, or fictional characters in other works by Dickens.

Gabriel Grubb –a gravedigger in a previous Christmas story by Dickens.

RIP Edwin Drood – “His Work Unfinished” – This is a reference to Edwin Drood, the final novel by Dickens. However, due to the unfortunate death of Dickens, prior to its completion, its outcome remains a mystery.

George Cruikshank – Cruikshank was a talented illustrator, artist, and caricaturist, in Victorian Britain. Cruikishank had illustrated three previous works by Dickens, including Oliver Twist, and the two became friends. However, the friends had a falling out in 1871, when Cruikshank publicly claimed credit for originating the plot of Oliver Twist, which Dickens strenuously denied.

Here Lies Bill Sykes – A Fine Good Riddance - Bill Sykes was the fictional villain in Oliver Twist.

Wackford Squeers - A character from Dickens’s novel, Nicholas Nickleby.





If you'd like to leave Macy's Dickens Village and return to the Home Page of Enjoying Philadelphia, please click here.

If You Like Our Content, Please Like Us on Facebook!

Sign Up For Free E-mail Updates For Philadelphia Events!

Enter your E-mail Address
Enter your First Name (optional)
Then

Don't worry — your e-mail address is totally secure.
I promise to use it only to send you Enjoying Philadelphia - Events and Things To Do In the City and Region.


If You Like Our Content, Please Like Us on Facebook!